Nov. 3, 2021

Avoid the High Cost of Low Prices - Make it in America! – with James Stuber [Ep.95]

Avoid the High Cost of Low Prices - Make it in America! – with James Stuber [Ep.95]

It is no secret that America is currently suffering from supply chain issues. Many store shelves are empty and needed items are hard to find. Businesses and consumers are frustrated with seemingly endless back-orders, delays, and price increases. They...


It is no secret that America is currently suffering from supply chain issues. Many store shelves are empty and needed items are hard to find. Businesses and consumers are frustrated with seemingly endless back-orders, delays, and price increases. They are even more frustrated with those in government responsible for preventing and alleviating the crisis. How did we get here and what can be done about it? In the past, consumers demanded lower prices, leading to many jobs being shipped to countries with lower labor costs. However, there is a high cost to lower prices. Our dependence on other countries for essential products and materials has threatened our national security, our energy, medical, and food supply, and it has had a devastating effect on our economy. In this episode, Linda interviews James Stuber, Founder of Made in America Again, an organization created to educate, motivate, and inspire Americans to restore and nurture individual communities and the American Dream through the power of consumer choice. Learn how you can make a difference and avoid the high cost of low prices by choosing American made products.  

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Transcript

Linda:

Welcome. Thank you for tuning in to this episode of the Prosperity 101 Breakroom Economics podcast. My name is Linda J. Hansen, your host, and the author of Prosperity 101-Job Security Through Business Prosperity, the essential guide to understanding how policy affects your paycheck and the creator of the Breakroom Economics online course. The book, the course and the entire podcast library can be found on prosperity101.com. I seek to connect boardroom to Breakroom and policy to paycheck by empowering and encouraging employers to educate employees about the public policy issues that affect their jobs. My goal is to help people understand the foundations of prosperity, the policies of prosperity, and how to protect their prosperity by becoming informed, involved, and impactful. I believe this will lead to greater employee loyalty, engagement and retention, and to an increased awareness of the blessings and responsibilities of living in a free society.

Linda:

Listen each week to hear from exciting guests and be sure to visit prosperity101.com. Thank you for joining with me today, we have all noticed, and it is no secret that America is suffering a supply chain crisis. Before I introduce my special guest, I'd like to read a short paragraph that will help us to have some food for thought about why this happens and what we can do about it. Here's the paragraph and I do not know the author. So, whoever the author is, thank you. Joe Smith started the day early having set his alarm clock, made in Japan, for 6:00 AM. While his coffee pot, made in China, was perking, he shaved with his electric razor, made in Hong Kong. He put on a dress shirt, made in Sri Lanka, designer jeans, made in Singapore and tennis shoes, made in Korea.

Linda:

After cooking his breakfast in his new electric skillet, made in India, he sat down with his calculator, made in Mexico, to see how much he could spend today. After setting his watch, made in Taiwan, to the radio, made in India, he got in his car, made in Germany, filled it with petrol from Saudi Arabia and continued his search for a job. At the end of yet another discouraging and fruitless day checking his computer, made in Malaysia, Joe decided to relax for a while. He put on his sandals, made in Brazil, poured himself a glass of wine, made in France and turned on his TV made in Indonesia, and then wondered why he can't find a good paying job in America.

Linda:

So with that, I'd like to introduce my next guest. Jim Stuber is the founder of, Made in America Again. He has a passion for staunching the flow of American jobs overseas and bringing jobs back to America in large part due to his family's background in steel making in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. Jim has devoted his career to public policy law and entrepreneurship. He began his career as legislative assistant to a member of the US health of representatives, focusing on matters before the committee on energy and commerce. He subsequently practiced legislative and administrative law in Washington, DC.

Linda:

After moving his law practiced to Florida, Jim assisted clients in foreign direct investment in the United States and served as president of the World Trade Council of Palm Beach county and as a legal advisor to the World Trade Center of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, working with the US Department of Commerce in the promotion of US exports. He also was legal counsel and interim CEO of a major destination marketing corporation and was a candidate for election in the 16th congressional district of Florida. As an entrepreneur and attorney, Jim has been a co-founder or key team member of numerous emerging growth companies in the technology sector. Jim resides in Pennsylvania with his wife and four children. And with that introduction, I welcome you, Jim Stuber, thank you for being part of the podcast today.

Jim:

Thank you, Linda. It's so great to be with you.

Linda:

Well, I love the mission of Made In America Again. A simple paragraph that you have listed on your website. It says, it's a movement of consumers dedicated to building healthy communities by buying things made in those communities. It sounds so simple. Why aren't we doing this?

Jim:

I know it does, doesn't it?

Linda:

Right.

Jim:

It's really... Go ahead.

Linda:

What led you to starting this organization?

Jim:

Well, in the introduction, you referred to the background. This was what... all my family did was work in the steel mills in Pittsburgh, in Ohio. Some of them even worked in the coal mines that got the coals that went into the steel mills. So that was my background and it always bothered me in the 70s and 80s, when we were seeing those jobs, go overseas and the steel mills and factories closing down, it bothered me a lot, but not enough to do anything about it. I didn't think I could do anything at it. So one night, this was 2012 actually, I took out a light bulb and I was going to put it in the socket and I looked at it and on it was two things, the GE logo and under that in all caps, the word China. And the GE logo stands for all things American, American ingenuity and Thomas Edison.

Jim:

And I thought, if GE is making its light bulbs in China, maybe we have a problem. So this is something that would not let go of me. And I embarked on this journey to answer the questions, why was it that this light bulb and pretty much everything else that you just read, was being made somewhere else? How did that happen? Why did that happen? And is it causing a problem? And if it is causing a problem, what can we do about it? So, that was the journey and I just wouldn't let go. And I ended up spending three years in my college library and emerging with a book that answered those three questions.

Linda:

Well, tell us more about that book.

Jim:

Well, I started out with the first question, why is everything made somewhere else? And Linda, I thought I was pretty well informed, but 95% of what's in that book, I did not know. So I did not know that it was really in 1934. In the 1932 election, Franklin Roosevelt and the Democrats were running on the platform of free trade. They were trying to blame the depression on the Smoot-Hawley tariffs, which is not true by the way, but it's still something that kicks around. And so they enacted in 1934, a law that authorized the president to negotiate away all of our [inaudible 00:07:25] with other countries. So they started on it, but it didn't really kick in until after the war. In 1945, when my father and a million and a half other Americans came home from the war and started making the steel that went into our bridges and automobiles and blenders and everything.

Jim:

These are the seeds of our destruction that had been sewn because we were opening our markets up to the rest of the world. And so I traced the history of that playing out for 50 years with Japan and that what I call the era of free trade. And then for another 25 years with China and the World Trade Organization and globalization. So, when you read it, it's a pretty sorry history because our leaders really sold us out. They were buying into these theories about how this was going to be so good for us and be a win-win. And that when you look at the theories there, they're patently ridiculous that we were going to keep all the good jobs and just have the low skilled jobs overseas, or we were going to make the high value products and let them just do the low value products overseas.

Jim:

They didn't buy into any of that. Or that we were going to build up a big middle class in Mexico that were going to buy stuff from us. Of course, the opposite turned out after we [inaudible 00:08:42] the North American Free Trade Agreement. And it turned out to be the reverse. Of course, we didn't build up any big middle class in Mexico. They were too poor to buy our stuff but they made a lot of stuff to sell into the United States. So, this history, I really commend to everyone to inform themselves about it and to see how wrong this all was. And then of course I had looked at the impacts this has had, which have been disastrous.

Linda:

I'm sure that that book is very informative. Could you please give the listeners the title and where they could obtain it?

Jim:

Yes. So it is called, What If Things Were Made In America Again, and that sounds like a pretty catchy title, but I have a long subtitle, which is the one you just referred to, how consumers can rebuild the middle class by buying things made in American communities. Because at the end of the day, I see that we consumers have the power to change this, which we'll talk about. I do the website you refer to as miaa.us, for Made In America Again.us. So it's nice short, miaa.us. If our listeners want to go there, they can learn, not only just how to buy of the book, but how they can get involved in changing some of these things which we will talk about.

Linda:

That is fantastic. I was just with a young person who said it's great to think about buying things made in America, but what about the prices? As young people are struggling to be able to obtain home ownership, especially in this current administration and then with inflation, or shall I say stagflation occurring now. We look at the rising prices and the increased costs. It's hard for young people to really be able to establish new homes and people discouraged from starting families. And people are concerned about starting families and being able to afford the needed things for their children as they grow. And these are real concerns. And as we look at these jobs that have gone overseas, we look at the products that I mentioned, everything seems to be made elsewhere.

Linda:

I have tried to consistently look at manufacturing locations and it is... I'd say eight out of 10 things I look at, are made in a different country. And I believe we need to change that. And that's why I have you on the broadcast today because I am so committed to helping us understand that, like you mentioned, we, as consumers can make the difference. And people have complained about the higher prices of American made products. And I would say, well, there's all kinds of high prices and some of them don't involve money. So.

Jim:

It's very well said. I refer to that as the high cost of low price. There are a lot of costs that we pay that we aren't thinking about if we just are looking at the price on that particular product. So, but first let me mention that it's surprising how often you can find an American made equivalent of something that's made overseas. I'm thinking of some notebooks. I was in my college library and on one kiosk was an Italian brand that was being made in China until they moved it to Vietnam. But right next to it were the Shinola notebooks made in Detroit and they were the same price. So, I would start out by saying that one thing we can all do is just become avid label readers and start paying attention to that.

Jim:

And I think that we will be pleasantly surprised that, if you're just buying razors, there are things you can do. Just take a moment and say, oh yes, this one was made in France because it's a Bic, or this one was made in Mexico, it's Gillette, but here's a shit razor and I looked at it and darn if the darn thing isn't made in the United state. So it just took me a little while to have a look at that. So, that's the first thing. And then this business about how good low prices are. So we have to understand the high costs that goes into that. First, there's a high cost overseas because a lot of times, the working can conditions of the workers are really terrible and they're also destroying their environment. In China, you can't plant plants in the soil because it's been destroyed.

Jim:

The rivers are polluted. So, they have cancer villages where people who worked in these factories, all the men have cancer. So, we're not necessarily helping anybody over there. But the real cost starts with the communities in the United States where we used to make that thing. And we consumers aren't thinking about the fact that, when we buy that thing that was made in Renoso, Mexico, instead of Flint, Michigan, that there's a moral component to that. And that in the process, we are destroying a life or a family or a community in making that decision. So, this was the thing, Linda, that grabbed me the most as I was working on the book, was just this whole moral dimension of volunteering ordinary Americans to the project of low price or of curing poverty abroad.

Jim:

They didn't sign up for that. And if any of us want to do that, we can do it. We can make a contribution to some foundation or we could give up half of our income if we wanted to. But what we've been doing is volunteering ordinary Americans to cut their income in half from $30 an hour to $15 an hour. And thank you very much. Now I can buy my stuff for 30% less. And by the way, we raise up all those hundreds of millions of people out of poverty overseas. Thanks. Don't you feel good about that? That's what we're saying to these Americans that we volunteer for the project. So I get pretty hot into the caller about that. Because that's really wrong.

Linda:

I understand. And I love the way you put that, the high cost of low prices. This is one of the things I think if we could really help people understand that there's so much that goes into the pricing of goods or services. And as we look at the supply chain issues we're having now, as we look at our energy independence or dependence, all these things factor into what a final price is for a good or a service. And when we're just looking at the bottom line in terms of the price, we often forget all the big picture items that go into that. So-

Jim:

Sure.

Linda:

I truly... Oh, go ahead.

Jim:

The economists also talk about something that they have this fancy name for, it's called externalities. So it's not even just what goes into that price of that product, but then it... Okay, to buy that thing for that low price, in the process, I have decimated the tax base in that community and now they don't have the money to run their schools. And so now they've got a problem. Now we've got a drug abuse problem in that community because the people who lost these jobs are buying drugs from the people down in Renoso, where their jobs went. These are costs. And some of these costs aren't just hitting these families or these communities that we don't live in, eventually they come around and come home and reach to us. So, we need to understand that even from a personal point of view, we may be paying a cost. Maybe we're paying higher taxes because those people lost their jobs and now they're not paying taxes.

Linda:

That's a very good point. And I look at this also as a national security issue. As we saw definitely during the height of the COVID 19 pandemic, we could see how reliant we were on external supply chain. And actually we were reliant on China for so much of our needs at that time. And so, this is truly a national security issue if we are depending on our computer chips, our vehicles, our weapons, all of our information technology to be part of something that is really an adversarial country. We need to look at that and say, well, how do we protect American interests and American security? Would you like to add to that?

Jim:

Yeah. So, the first part of that is that we are dependent upon them. So having these dependencies in itself is a national security problem. But then also, they're taking all that money and they're building up their military with it. So then we say, oh my gosh, they're building up their military, now we have to build up our military. So we have to increase our defense budget and we taxpayers have to pay the taxes to do that. So now we're paying another cost because sending all that money to China means we need a larger military to match theirs. So it's chasing your tail. It's really not in our national interests whatsoever.

Jim:

But especially this dependency on China for, as you said, for the medicine that our service people would need if we were at war with China and oh, it's our enemy that we're fighting, where we used get that medicine now we don't have it. I have a friend who wrote a book about the dependency on China for our drugs and she said that our hospitals will last about a month without these things. Now that's not just national military security, that's national health security, that's national security [inaudible 00:18:46] large.

Linda:

Absolutely. And so, what would you say to employers and to consumers in terms of the best next steps that they can take to help secure a supply chain for American goods and services that really protects our national security and protects our economic and health security?

Jim:

Well, start with our own personal buying decisions. And the first thing I would say to our consumers, is buy an American car. So that may seem like it's coming out of the blue, but when I was considering whether consumers could have an impact on this, I looked to see, how much spending is out there that we could bring home. And I identified $600 billion of spending that we are spending on consumer products. These are end user products that we're buying abroad, that if we brought home would only balance trade. We're not even saying, stop buying from abroad, but that would bring our trade into balance and 200 billion of that was for automobiles and parts.

Jim:

So if you stop and think about our largest purchases besides a house, it's going to be your car. And so, if you happen to be in the market for a car, pay attention. I remember how shocked I was when I realized that Buick had decided they had a hole in their lineup for a certain size SUV and they said, "Oh, well, we're making this in China." But rather than restart their SUV plant here, they said, "We'll just bring some of those in from China." And I was thinking, we shouldn't be buying the Buick made in China and we don't have to.

Jim:

So personally, I ran this choice in the fall of 2019. We wanted a two row SUV, and I could have bought a Chevrolet Equinox made in Mexico, but I bought just as good, if not better, a car made by Jeep with 75% US content. Now that didn't take any sacrifice on my part. It just took a moment for me to stop and think. And if you're not in the market for a car, make sure the next set of tires you buy is American made.

Jim:

It's surprising what effect we can have as consumers. And then for the businesses, I would say I have gotten involved in an organization called the Coalition for a Prosperous America. It's a spinoff of companies that were in the National Association of Manufacturers until it became clear. The NAM had gone globalists and they weren't a national manufacturers organization whatsoever. But the Coalition for a Prosperous America is people who are still really making things here. And so, it's a good way for our companies to find each other, because most of the CPA members are makers of intermediate goods or they're machine shops, or they're the people who make things that other manufacturers buy. And then it also gives our companies an opportunity to take part in policy making because the consumer solution that I propose, isn't the only solution, It's a big part of it.

Jim:

But as you so well said, policy matters. And so, for our business, you can get involved in CPA and for consumers, if you go to miaa.us, it'll lead you to one of my nonprofits where I am giving consumers an opportunity to get involved. So, the thing I love about this, Linda, is, it's something we can do without government permission or support. Nobody can stop us from going out this afternoon and being a label reader when we go in the store. But there's a couple of things the government should do. One is, when they're spending our tax dollars, to spend them on American made goods. But the other thing that the government could do is to strengthen our labeling laws so that we consumers can tell where the heck something's made when we're buying it, especially on the internet.

Jim:

We can look at the fine print on a package when we're in the store, but right now, when you go on the internet, you don't know where the darn thing is made, and they're going make it look as much as possible, like it was made in the United States and give it a nice American name. So, I proposed in the last chapter of the book that we do require that disclosure when things are being sold on the internet. And Senator of Wisconsin, got interested in this Bill and she introduced it in the last Congress. And I'm happy to say that she offered it as an amendment to a Bill that was moving through the Senate and it passed the Senate in June. So, I'm pretty encouraged because I think we have a good shot at getting this through the house as well. They'll have this information when they're on the internet and they can say, no, thanks to these Chinese companies that Amazon are so avidly recruiting onto their website and find something made in the United States.

Linda:

It's interesting. I was following that and I'm very well aware of CPA or the Coalition for Prosperous America and some of the people there I know, and they're just great. So for businesses interested in that, please pursue that. And you can reach out to me or to Jim for more information. But also the gentleman that introduced you and I to each other is Brad Winnings from Made in America and their website is, madeinamerica.org. And I know that they really focus on promoting companies that produce products made in America. And I've been fortunate to interview several of the members in that organization. And it's great to hear the stories of what led people to making things solely in America. And when we make things in America, like you said, the supply chain is important too.

Linda:

So, producers can look and see, well, if we fully source it in America, that's even better. Your end product is made in America and every piece of that product, or every component is also made in America. It's just a win-win. And then if we can then export that, we have quality products that are then exported to other countries, and it helps our nation as a whole. So, it helps individual consumers, it helps businesses and the employees in those businesses, it helps communities by creating prosperity within the community and raising the tax base within the community. And it helps our nation to be more economically secure and militarily secure, our health security is more advanced and secure. So, there's so many benefits to this.

Jim:

Yes. And you mentioned that price can be a factor and indeed, many things do cost more. But there are many of us who do have a dollar, an extra dollar in our pocket, and it's like buying organic. This starts out... Things were more expensive when we first started buying organic. So we had to start with those of us who were a little better off. And so I say it to us who are a little better off, that we especially... not me, I'm not one of them, but those of us who are a little better off have a responsibility to take this on and then lead the way, because then it'll become just like organic, that it's something that everybody can afford as we grow this. And as people have, they do start getting these well paying jobs back and they are able to take part in this project because we've rebuilt our middle class.

Linda:

Well, you bring up a good point, but I also believe that this is about education.

Jim:

Absolutely.

Linda:

So, if we can educate people on the hidden costs of buying things from other countries, they won't mind so much paying a little more on the price at times, because they'll understand that the overall price is actually lower when you factor in all of the different results of buying from other countries. So the overall price is not just what is on the label or the price tag or the sticker price of a car. The overall price brings into light all the things that you discussed, the effects on the community, the effects on the individual, the effects on our nation.

Linda:

So, for everybody who just thinks it's about price, please think again. And I've talked to business owners who are sourcing things from other countries and they try to be very responsible about it. But again, it goes back to the consumer. They're doing that because consumer is buying by price. If the consumer is educated and starts to demand to buy that larger-

Jim:

Exactly.

Linda:

... The larger issue of buying things American made, then businesses will respond accordingly. So, the three things you'd like to have consumers say to businesses they frequent, what would you have them say?

Jim:

Can you get me any of these that are made in the United States? And then they're going to say to their buyers, "Hey, everybody's asking me for something made in the US. Can you find me something in the US?" And as you so well said that, the way our economic system works, if you've got that demand, then the companies, the supply will respond to it. We will expand those factories or open those factories. So it can be a consumer driven thing if we just start asking for it, start looking for it.

Linda:

Right. And it's not hard. When I bought a car recently, I was thrilled. I actually opened up, I think, inside the driver's door, you can usually see where the car was produced. And actually my salesperson on the lot was annoyed with me because I kept opening the doors of the cars saying, "Where is this car made?" And I wouldn't even consider purchasing something until I saw something made in America. So.

Jim:

That is such a great example. Yes. If everyone just did that then Buick wouldn't... and it's not just Buick, of course, but Buick wouldn't be selling these Chinese cars. They'd go, "We can get rid of those things."

Linda:

Right. And so, again, and as we speak up about it, we're educating someone. We're helping to do that. So, my podcast really encourages employers to talk to employees about these issues. So, if you could give three tips for employers to educate employees about the importance of producing and buying things in America, even if the price might be a little more, what would you say?

Jim:

Well, I'd start out with the idea that if they'll buy something made in America, they are going to help some American family be earning a family wage and that they can afford to buy the things our company makes. So, if we go out there and support our fellow Americans, we're going to be creating demand for whatever it is our company does.

Linda:

Exactly.

Jim:

I think that's really the key to the whole thing. And then I think that we still can't avoid suggesting to them that, we have a document that starts with we, the people. And so, who is we and who is us? We all are parties to this social contract. And in law school, you learn that there's a duty involved in that. Parties to a contract have a duty to each other. So, if I were an employer talking to my employees, I'd remind them that we are all part of this thing and that we can't just ignore each other. And so there's a moral piece to this. And I think the third thing I would say to them is, oh, and by the way, we have this big adversary that we have helped grow over there across the Pacific, and that they really are dedicated, they're really against everything we stand for, the freedoms that we enjoy and especially the freedom of religion.

Jim:

And if you like going to church on Sunday, you have to remember that this really matters. And if you're buying the things that are made in China, you are supporting a communist regime that does not want anything to get in the way of them, whether it be Christianity or [inaudible 00:31:35] communist party is God. And don't try to change that. So, we have to remember this. This third dimension to all of this is, our national security and the world order. Who's going to be running the world, if it's China or America, I think it's going to make a big difference.

Linda:

Absolutely. And we look at that and think about the freedom for future generations.

Jim:

Absolutely.

Linda:

I think about how my grandma always used to say, you can be penny-wise, but pound-foolish.

Jim:

That is all well said.

Linda:

And so if we are penny-wise in pound-foolish when we're purchasing products that are made in other countries, especially adversarial countries like China, we can really feel the effects, not immediately, but down the line and in future generations. So if we really care about promoting and protecting freedom for our children, our grandchildren, and making sure America is strong, as that beacon of freedom for the world, we need to pay more attention to where our products are produced. So.

Jim:

Yes. And you just reminded me of something, Linda. So, in the very big picture for our children, our grandchildren, I think that's true. But even more immediately, our children... And I've had to have this conversation now because my children are just starting college. So, what do we say to our children about what to study that we're not going to send to China or India? It becomes very problematical. And so again, penny-wise and pound-foolish, and we can be going for the low price, but it's not even just these manufacturing jobs, it's our white collar jobs. It's these good jobs that some of our theorists thought we were going to keep. They thought, oh, we'll let them make things and then we'll just be the designers or the creatives here.

Jim:

And then it turns out that we have consulting firms that are busy helping people outsource that work to India or to somebody imported from India. And you can show up at work on Friday and say, "Thanks, but don't come in on Monday because we've got somebody in from India who's going to start doing your job on Monday." So it's really across the board and it's not just the moral issue, but it's in our self-interest. And if it's not my job, well, what jobs are going to be available to my children that we aren't going to outsource? So it's really, in the large sense, how much are we going to limit the opportunities of our children and our grandchildren?

Linda:

Right. Very well said. And I love it that your dog joined the interview. So what is your dog's name? And this is just an aside.

Jim:

That's Augie.

Linda:

For listeners who are wondering what that background noise is, his dog joined the interview. And I could see on the video, it just would not stay away. So it's great. So dogs are welcome. One of the things too that in closing, I just really want to encourage all listeners to think through what your long term goals are for yourself, your family and for your country. Because as we are looking at many people trying to reshape America and really gut our American constitution and the freedoms that we have, you mentioned freedom of religion, that is not the only freedom that is at risk right now in the United States of America.

Linda:

And so we think of our Bill Of Rights. And policy matters. And so to everyone listening, pay attention, not only to where your products are made and your goods and services are coming from, but pay attention to the policies that are being enacted on Capitol Hill and in your state and local governments, because policy matters, policy affects paycheck and policy affects every single family.

Linda:

And we can see all across the nation right now, how different policies are affecting different segments of society. And so we really do need to pay attention. And for Americans who have been maybe a little complacent or thought, oh, other people will take care of that, or I hate to get involved in politics, it matters because politics affects every single aspect of your life. It affects the cost of the onions you buy at the store, or if you can buy onions, that it affects what is being taught in your children's school. It affects what kind of car you drive. It affects your computer that you're using. We can see through this conversation that politics and policy affect every area of your life. So do not be afraid to be involved, even if it is something as simple as reading the labels and making sure to buy American made products. So, with that, I'd like to just, make sure people can contact you. So, what is the way for them to contact you, Jim?

Jim:

Well, my email is jstuber, S-T-U-B-E-R, @miaa.us. And I'm actually going to put out my phone number as well, (610) 608-5074, because I care so deeply about this, I'm always delighted to have anyone call me or email me who would like to see what they can do in this effort.

Linda:

Oh, that would be fantastic. And again, please give them the title of your book and where they could obtain it.

Jim:

It's, What If Things Were Made In America Again, and you can find a way it at miaa.us and it's also for sale on Amazon.

Linda:

All right. Well, thank you so much. Do you have any closing comments?

Jim:

I just want to thank you for the opportunity, Linda, to do this. As you were just saying, I just wanted to add that, this is not a nice to do. This really matters a lot. It matters a lot for our children, those opportunities I was talking about, it matters for the future of the nation and it matters for the future of the world. So, I hope everyone can raise this in their hierarchy of things they care about to say, oh wait, that's something I really need to start paying attention to. So, thanks for the opportunity to get the word out.

Linda:

Well, thank you for your work because it's a simple thing that we can do and the effects can be enormous. And so if we all start to pay attention to where things are made and we encourage businesses and manufacturers to focus on things made in America, we will be helping our entire nation and like you said, the world because America needs to remain the beacon of freedom for the world. And we can only do that if we protect and support our capitalistic free enterprise society, but also we need to really support these American businesses and American manufacturing. So, thank you so much. And we look forward to having you back again.

Jim:

Thank you. It's been a great pleasure.

Linda:

All right. Thank you. Thank you again for listening to the Prosperity 101 podcast. If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe, share, and leave a great review. Don't forget to visit prosperity101.com to access the entire podcast library, to order my newest book, Job Security Through Business Prosperity, the essential guide to understanding how policy affects your paycheck, or to enroll you or your employees in the Breakroom Economics online course. You can also receive the free ebook, 10 Tips For Helping Employees Understand How Public Policy Affects Their Paychecks-Freedom is never free. Understanding the foundations of prosperity and the policies of prosperity will help you to protect prosperity as you become informed, involved, and impactful. I give special thanks to our sponsors, Matthews Archery Incorporated and Wisconsin Stamping and Manufacturing. Please contact us today at prosperity101.com to let us know how we can serve you. Thank you.